Bosnian Cook

Bosnia's cuisine with its special dishes satisfying to even the most exacting palate, concocted with as much inventiveness as the stories of the Arabian Nights . Bosnia is a gastronomic country in the highest sense of the word.

09.07.2013.

Ramadan in Bosnia

 

 

The most important celebratory, ritualized occasions in Bosnia and Herzegovina are Ramadan (Ramazan), Eid al-Fitr (Ramazanski Bajram), and Eid al-Adha (Kurbanski Bajram). These occasions are commemorated with tables overflowing with carefully prepared, often special foods.

 

 

 

Ramadan, the monthlong Muslim fast, is the major event in the Bosniaks (Bošnjaci) ritual calendar. Believers do not eat, drink, smoke, or have sex between sunrise and sunset. Families wake while it is still dark and eat a larger-than-usual breakfest, often including types of dishes served at midday and evening meals. Their evening meals also consist of more dishes than usual and often include dessert, which is not part of everyday meals. Ramadan is a period of intense devotional activity centered in the mosque and with much socializing in homes in the evenings. The evening meals, which break the day's fast, for example, are often shared with friends and neighbors. Eid al-Fitr is the celebration of the end of Ramadan, and Eid al-Adha is the commemoration, 40 days after Ramadan, of the saving of Abraham's (Ibrahim) son  through the sacrifice of a lamb instead.

 

 

 

IFTAR

 

 

Bosniaks would say prayer together during the day and then invite one another to their homes for iftar meals.

 

 

Bosnian Cook
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Typical Dishes

Most Bosnian specialties are of Turkish and Iranian origin and so exclude pork.
*Meat and vegetable dishes: casserole of ground beef and potato or eggplant (musaka); layered meat and vegetables (Bosanski lonac); lamb stewed with spinach and onions.
*Turkish-style pastry (burek) filled with potato (krompiruša), spinach (zeljanica) or cheese (sirnica).
*Soups: bean; chicken, or veal with okra (Begova čorba).
*Vegetables stuffed with meat and rice: pepper or zucchini (dolma); stuffed grape or cabbage leaves (sarma), piryan, etc.

*Side dishes of pickled cabbage; simple salad of tomato and onion. Yogurt often comes with meals.
*Desserts: fruit; rolled pancakes with sweet cream cheese filling; apple pie (pita sa jabukama) or other fruit-based cakes; nut and honey pastry (baklava, đul fatma).
*Drinks: fruit juices (including juniper berries rose petals, elderflower); strong sweet coffee; yogurt drink; bottled fizzy drinks; local wine and millet beer (boza); homemade brand (rakija) of plum, cherry, apple or pear.

Foodstuffs
*Staples: wheat bread, cornmeal, noodles, rice.
*Potato, peppers, tomato, cucumber, beans and other pulses.
*Grape, plum, apricot, pear, apple.
*Mutton, lamb (preferred), beef, chicken, ducks, eggs, dairy products, sausages, preserved meats.
*Fish/seafood from the Adriatic: shrimp, shellfish, octopus.
*Seasonings: garlic, onion, paprika, pepper.

Styles of Eating
• Most people eat three meals a day, lunchtime being the most substantial, usually consisting of two or three courses.
• Breakfast: bread with jam or honey, soft white cheese; hot tea, coffee, or milk to drink.
• Lunch: soup, meat or fish main dish, rice or potatoes or cornmeal mush, braised vegetables, fresh vegetable salad (summer) or pickled cabbage (winter), dessert.
• Supper: very light: leftovers from lunch or bread or potatoes or cornmeal mush, soft white cheese and/or could cuts.
• Snacks are eaten at any time of the day. Cakes and savory pastries (burek) are both popular, most often washed down by thick, black, sweet coffee.
• People tend to eat out often, and cafes are a major socializing place, particularly for men.

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