Bosnian Cook

Bosnia's cuisine with its special dishes satisfying to even the most exacting palate, concocted with as much inventiveness as the stories of the Arabian Nights . Bosnia is a gastronomic country in the highest sense of the word.

25.03.2013.

How to make Bosnian coffee?

Take some good coffee (Doncafe, the red packet
being my preferred version, I am far too much of a wuss to go for the super
strong green packet) and a Bosnian coffee maker thing that has a name but it
escapes me right now.








Put
one tablespoon per person into the coffee maker thing








Heat up
the coffee a little. When you can smell it add some boiling water






Wait a while, but
pay attention. The coffee will soon start to bubble up. If you aren't paying
attention it will go all over the hobs.






Take off the heat
and add just a tiny bit more water






This will lead to a
creamy sort of froth that looks as if you have added milk.






Let stand for a
little while. Then pour into a cup






Enjoy.



If you are Bosnian you will have already added a fair amount of sugar at the
beginning of the process with the coffee. You can now also dip a sugar cube into
the coffee as well, or even a Bosnian Delight (same as a Turkish Delight).
Bosnian Cook
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Typical Dishes

Most Bosnian specialties are of Turkish and Iranian origin and so exclude pork.
*Meat and vegetable dishes: casserole of ground beef and potato or eggplant (musaka); layered meat and vegetables (Bosanski lonac); lamb stewed with spinach and onions.
*Turkish-style pastry (burek) filled with potato (krompiruša), spinach (zeljanica) or cheese (sirnica).
*Soups: bean; chicken, or veal with okra (Begova čorba).
*Vegetables stuffed with meat and rice: pepper or zucchini (dolma); stuffed grape or cabbage leaves (sarma), piryan, etc.

*Side dishes of pickled cabbage; simple salad of tomato and onion. Yogurt often comes with meals.
*Desserts: fruit; rolled pancakes with sweet cream cheese filling; apple pie (pita sa jabukama) or other fruit-based cakes; nut and honey pastry (baklava, đul fatma).
*Drinks: fruit juices (including juniper berries rose petals, elderflower); strong sweet coffee; yogurt drink; bottled fizzy drinks; local wine and millet beer (boza); homemade brand (rakija) of plum, cherry, apple or pear.

Foodstuffs
*Staples: wheat bread, cornmeal, noodles, rice.
*Potato, peppers, tomato, cucumber, beans and other pulses.
*Grape, plum, apricot, pear, apple.
*Mutton, lamb (preferred), beef, chicken, ducks, eggs, dairy products, sausages, preserved meats.
*Fish/seafood from the Adriatic: shrimp, shellfish, octopus.
*Seasonings: garlic, onion, paprika, pepper.

Styles of Eating
• Most people eat three meals a day, lunchtime being the most substantial, usually consisting of two or three courses.
• Breakfast: bread with jam or honey, soft white cheese; hot tea, coffee, or milk to drink.
• Lunch: soup, meat or fish main dish, rice or potatoes or cornmeal mush, braised vegetables, fresh vegetable salad (summer) or pickled cabbage (winter), dessert.
• Supper: very light: leftovers from lunch or bread or potatoes or cornmeal mush, soft white cheese and/or could cuts.
• Snacks are eaten at any time of the day. Cakes and savory pastries (burek) are both popular, most often washed down by thick, black, sweet coffee.
• People tend to eat out often, and cafes are a major socializing place, particularly for men.

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